ROYALS, REDHEADS AND DÜRER PART III

Copyright Feb 24, 2014 by Dr. Elizabeth Garner and Joe Kiernan

In the previous parts of this series we’ve seen how redhead  Jewish DNA flows through almost all of the Royals of Europe and focused on this redheads of Eastern Europe.  We will now turn to the Italians.

Michelangelo’s Sistine Chapel

THE ITALIAN CONNECTION

The major ruling families of Italy during the time that the Dürers were very active in their art were the Medici family out of Florence and the Sforza family out of Milan.  We know for a fact that there was extensive artisitic activity happening in Florence under the auspices of the Medicis, probably the richest family in all of Europe, with Michaelangelo having been taken into the home of Cosimo the Elder.  Cosimo the Elder sponsored Donatello, Botticelli, Brunelleschi, Marsilio Ficino the mathemetician and also Michelangelo. There was also a major exchange of Ialian artists with the court of the Hungarian King, Matthias Corvinus.

THE MEDICIS

In 1437, Cosimo took over Florence by wit and financial adeptness but most importantly, he brought the Jews back to Florence, who had been kept out of Florence by the Christian moneylenders jealous of competition.  This act won the hearts of the Florentines because they could now get loans “like the big shots” allowing the common people to pay off crushing debts, buy homes, expand their businesses. From this point on the Jews’ fate with Florence would be forever linked to that of the de Medici family in Italy.  When the Medicis were chased out of town by their enemies, supported by the Vatican, the Jews left with them; when the Medicis took back control of the city, the Jews moved right back to Florence. Jews were sought for private tutoring and intellectuals retreats, causing the Dominicans in Florence ( the Catholic order to which the Pope gave the power of the Inquisition) and in Rome to be scandalized and who then wanted the whole de Medici clan dead.

 

Redheaded Cosimo de Medici by Botticelli
Piero the Gouty de Medici

After Cosimo died, his son Peiro inherited the financial responsibilities and caused disarray.  He died after 5 years leaving all on the shoulders of Lorenzo de Medici his oldest son, marrying Clarice Orsini, from an ancient line of roman nobility, raising the  social support of the upper class.  This marriage allowed the Medici’s to be perceived as a “royal family” of Florence, givng them much more political power.

More political intrigue ensued with the Pope and the DominIcans, and the Medicis lost a very giant monopoly on alum.  By 1489 Lorenzo discovered Michaelangelo working for Ghirlandaio and ultimatlely brought him to live in the grand de Medici palace.  Thus Michaelangelo was raised with the richest offspring in Europe, taking all his meals with then and studying with the best private tutors of the land.

Lorenzo de Medici by Ghirandaio
CATHERINE DE MEDICI
CATHERINE DE MEDICI

Almost all of the Medicis were redheads.

 THE SFORZAS

Sforza was a ruling family of  based in Milan. They acquired the dukedom and Duchy of Milan from the previously ruling Visconti family  in the mid-15th century.  The Medicis had engineered the destruction of the Viscontis with their replacement by the Sforzas. They lost it to the Spanish Hapsburgs about a century later.

Rising from rural nobility, the Sforzas became condotierri and used this military position to become rulers in Milan. The family governed by force, ruse, and power politics, similar to the Medici in Florence. Under their rule the city-state flourished and expanded.

MUZIO SFORZA

MUZIO SFORZA FROM A MINIATURE

Giacomo or Jacopo Attendolo (1369–1424), called Sforza (from sforzare, to exert or force), founded the dynasty. A condottiero from Romagna, he served the Angevin kings of Naples and became the most successful dynast of the condottieri.

His son Francesco I Sforza ruled Milan starting in 1447.

FRANCESCO I AND HIS WIFE BIANCA-MORE REDHEADS

The family also held the seigniory of Pesaro starting from Muzio Attendolo’s second son, Alessandro (1409–1473).

Read headed Galeazzo

The Sforza held Pesaro until 1519, with the death of Galeazzo.

Muzio’s third son, Bozzio (1411–1476), founded the branch of Santa Fiora in Tuscany, who held the title of count of Cotignola. The Sforza ruled the small territory until 1624. Members of this family also held important ecclesiastical and political position in the Papal States, and moved to Rome in 1674 taking the name Sforza Cesarini.

Muzio’s third son, Bozzio (1411–1476), founded the branch of Santa Fiora in Tuscany, who held the title of count of Cotignola. The Sforza ruled the small  until 1624. Members of this family also held important ecclesiastical and political positions in the Papal States, and moved to Rome in 1674 taking the name Sforza Cesarini.

The Sforza would later join with the Borgia family, through the arranged marriage of Lucrezia Borgia to Giovanni (the illegitimate son of Constanza of Pesaro).

Lucrezia Borgia as St. Catherine-another redhead

 

Ludivico Sforza (known as Ludovico il Moro, famous for taking Leonardo da Vinci into his service)

Ludivico Sforza, Il Moro

was defeated in 1500 by the French army of Louis XII of France in the Italian Wars.

 

Louis XII of France-another redhead, brother of Charles VIII, who repudiated Emperor Maximillian’s daughter, Margaret of Austria, and stole Maximillian’s fiancee, Andde of Brittany whom, Louis XII married upon Charles’ death

After Imperial German troops drove out the French, Maximilian Sforza,

Maximilian Sforza-a beautiful fiery ginger redhead

son of Ludovico, became Duke of Milan (1512-1515) until the French returned under Francis I of France and imprisoned him.

 

Francis I of France-who built Fountainblu-another redhead

OTHER SFORZA REDHEADS

GianGaleazzo Maria Sforza and his wife Isabella of Aragon

Giangaleazzo Maria Sforza (1469-1494) painted as Saint Sebastian by Giovanni Ambrogio de Predis in 1483 and his wife Isabella of Aragon painted around 1500 by Raphael. The marriage was arranged by his brother Lodovico

 

BIANCA MARIA SFORZA, WIFE AND EMPRESS OF HOLY ROMAN EMPEROR MAXIMILIAN

Bianca Maria Sforza, wife to Holy Roman Emperor Maximillian and Empress

LEONARDO DA VINCI’S REDHEAD SFORZA LUDICICO SFORZA’S MISTRESS CECILIA

LEONARDO’S PAINTING OF IL MORO’S MISTRESS CECILIA, KNOWN AS THE GIRL WITH THE ERMINE (BUT IT’S A FERRET)

Cecilia was born into a large family from Siena. Her father’s name was Fazio. He was not of nobility, but he occupied several posts at the Milanese court, including the position of ambassador to Florence and Lucca. Her mother was Margherita Busti, the daughter of a noted doctor of law.

She was educated alongside her six brothers in Latin and literature. In 1483 at the age of ten, Cecilia was betrothed to Stefano Visconti, but the betrothal was broken off in 1487 for reasons unknown. In May 1489, she left home for the Monastero Nuovo, and it was possibly there where she met Ludovico.

Cecilia spoke Latin fluently and was said to be a gifted musician and singer. She also wrote poetry. In about 1489, she sat for Ludovico’s court artist and engineer, Leonardo da Vinci, who painted her celebrated portrait, which is known as The Lady with an Ermine. Isabella d”Este, an admirer of the work of Leonardo, and soon to be the wife of Ludivico, asked to borrow the portrait, but Cecilia replied it no longer looked like her because she had been so young then and ‘nobody seeing it and me together would suppose it was made for me’. She did not lend the portrait.

Even after Ludovico married Beatrice d” Este, Cecilia continued to keep her apartments in Ludovico’s castle. She had a son, Cesare, on 3 May 1491 by Ludovico.

When Beatrice d’Este found out about their relationship, Ludovico was constrained to ask Cecilia to leave the Porta Giovia castle, the seat of the ducal court. She was first installed in the Verme Palace, and then given the Carmagnola Palace in 1492, when she married Count Ludovico Carminati de’ Brambilla, known as “Il Bergamino”. She bore her husband four children. After the death of both her husband and her son (1514–1515), she retired to San Giovanno of Croce, a castle near Cremona.

Cesare, the son of Cecilia and Ludovico Sforza was made abbot of the Church of San Nazaro Maggiore of Milan in 1498; in 1505, he became canon of Milan. He died in 1512.

Prior to and throughout the duration of his marriage, Ludovico is known to have had other mistresses, although it is thought that he kept only one mistress at a time. Bernardina de Corradis

Bianca Giovana Sforza of Ludivico Sforza and his mistress Bernadinda de Corradis

was an early mistress who bore him a daughter, Bianca Giovanna. The child was legitimized and later married to Galeazzo Sanseverino 

Galeazzo de Senserverino

in 1496. Cecilia Gallerani, believed to be a favourite, gave birth to a son named Cesare

Cesare Sforza, the bastard of Cecilia, Ludivico’s mistress

on 3 May 1491, in the same year in which he married Beatrice d’Este.  Another mistress was Lucrezia Crivelli,

Lucrezia Crivelli another of Leonardo’s famous portraits

who bore him another illegitimate son, Giovani Paulo,

Giovanni I Paolo Sforza

born in the year of Beatrice’s death. He was a conditerrie. Ludovico also fathered a third illegitimate son, called Sforza, who was born around 1484 and died suddenly in 1487; the boy’s mother is unknown.

So almost all the Sforza were redheads with Jewish redhead genes in their ancestry.

THE FRENCH AND THE ENGLISH
Just to be fair, we include a few French redheads also that was intermarried to everyone in Western and Eastern Europe.
Claude de France, daughter of Louis XII and Anne of Brittany
Claude, daughter of Louis XII and Anne of Brittany
FRANCISZEK III BRETONSKI, DUKE OF BRITTANY AFTER FRANCIS I OF FRANCE, SON OF LOUIS XII AND ANNE OF BRITTANY
FRANCISZEK III BRETONSKI, SONE OF LOUIS XII AND ANNE OF BRITTANY
MARY OF GUISE, MOTHER OF MARY, QUEEN OF SCOTS
MARY OF GUISE, MOTHER OF MARY, QUEEEN OF SCOTS

MARY STUART, QUEEN OF SCOTS

MARY, QUEEN OF SCOTS

HENRY VIII

HENRY VIII

ELIZABETH I

ELIZABETH I

 

So even the French and English had the royal redhead Jewish genes, as did the Duerers, from the royals of the Khazars

We will next go to the court of Matthais Corvinus to learn about the Hungarian Renaissance  and then to Spain for some significant new discoveries.  Stay tuned!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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8 thoughts on “ROYALS, REDHEADS AND DÜRER PART III

  1. Hi there,
    I read your interesting articles about royals and redheads and I have a question. Some of the people whose portraits you posted don’t seem very red-haired to me. Some of the Italians, for example, or Francis I of France. The portrait of Ludovico il Moro is missing in the article, but he looks quite dark-haired. So how could you say they are really red-haired? Because it would be really a shock if a person called “il Moro” were a redhead! 😉

    1. Thank you Zelda,for bringing to my attention broke links in some articles. You are correct about Ludivico, he was painted with very black hair, Il Moro certainly was not red haired but genetically a carrier and involved with women with red hair genes.

      The expression of “red hair” as we normally think of it is not just the fiery red, called gingers, of someone like Prince Harry, I was surprised at what a range of colors the redhead genetic haploid groups express and it does include many that we would normally call blonde such as Francis I. If you watch the YouTube video of this article, the genetics may be clearer to you.

      Thanks for reading!

      Best,

      Elizabeth

      1. Thank you for your answer. I see what you mean. I’ve just this portrait of Francis I of France and he seems quite reddish. http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/8/86/Jean_Clouet_-_Portrait_de_Fran%C3%A7ois_Ier_%281494-1547%29%2C_roi_de_France_-_Google_Art_Project.jpg
        The problem is that sometime men’s hair darkens with age, so, unless you find portraits of them as children or teenagers, you don’t know for sure what colour their hair is.
        I’m looking forward to the rest of the article. I was sure Matthias Corvinus (being “corvinus”) had dark hair!

          1. I will check that Zelda, thx! The point of the article is that the red hair haploid expressions demonstrate the genetic connections ago what would appear disparate groups and monarchies we no longer have to guess, rely on self serving or inaccurate historical accounts. We can now see real historical data as expressed by the DNA.

            Best,

            Elizabeth

        1. If one is lucky enough to have the subject painted as a child, the hair color demonstrated will be the best to use, for you are correct, hair color will change due to age or disease vectors or food supply, eg environmental factors.

          Best,

          Elizabeth

        2. As for Corvinus, which means crow in Latin, the crow is his heraldic symbol, originating from a legend in thr area over which he controlled which kept changing often

          1. I didn’t know this. Since in Italy we use the word corvino to refer to very dark hair (because of the colour of the crow), I was sure he had dark hair. I read about him while writing my graduation thesis, but I never saw his portraits.

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