“MIKE YOU’RE FUCKED.” CAN’T GET BETTER SLIME THAN THIS! SO YOU WANNA BE AN ARTIST?

 

 

DURER. ALBRECHT VOS AMWAY CONTEMPORARY ARET BUSSLSHIT
SEX OR MONEY YOU WANT TO BE FAMOUS OR YOU WANT TO BE A PAWN OF FILTH?

READY TO COMPETE FOR THIS BIG ART AWARD FUNDED BY CRUD MOVING YOU AROUND LIKE A PAWN? READ ON, THOSE OF YOU WHO LIVE AND BREATHE ART. HERE’S HOW YOU’RE GETTING USED.

 

ArtPrize, the quirky, democratic annual art competition that takes place in Grand Rapids, Michigan, is back for its seventh year with some exciting new additions (see Hate Your Job? ArtPrize Seeks Education Manager). The event will take place from September 23–October 11, 2015.

This year’s iteration will feature a new $40,000 curatorial fellowship and a $30,000 grant program for local exhibition venues.

WOW YOU CAN MAKE A WHOLE BIG $40,000 CURATORIAL FELLOWSHIP!  GOT $ TO EAT? HERE’S THE CRUD FUNDING THIS:  AMWAY!

IN THE PREDAWN TWILIGHT of December 4, 2012, Randy Richardville, the Republican majority leader of the Michigan Senate, called an old friend to deliver some grim news. Richardville’s two-hour commute to the state capitol in Lansing gave him plenty of time to check in with friends, staff, and colleagues, who were accustomed to his early morning calls. None more so than Mike Jackson.

Jackson and Richardville had grown up in the auto town of Monroe, 40 miles south of Detroit. Jackson now headed Michigan’s 14,000-member carpenters and millwrights’ union, which had endorsed Richardville, a moderate Republican, for 10 of the 12 years he’d served in the state Legislature.

“Guess where I was last night,” Richardville said.
Jackson wasn’t in a guessing mood—and it wasn’t just the early hour. Since the election a few weeks earlier, Republicans had been aiming to use the current lame-duck session to ram through a controversial piece of legislation known as right-to-work. Such laws, already on the books in 23 states, outlawed contracts requiring all employees in a unionized workplace to pay dues for union representation. Jackson and other labor leaders were scrambling to head off the bill, widely regarded as a disaster for unions. Richardville, who had once told a hotel conference room filled with union members that right-to-work would pass “over my dead body,” was one of the votes they’d counted on.

Richardville said he’d spent the previous evening at a fundraiser in western Michigan. At one point during the event, he was escorted into a private room where a dozen wealthy business moguls were waiting for him. Some he recognized as heavy hitters in Michigan politics; others had flown in from out of state.

One of the men in the room glared at Richardville. “You gotta grow a set and move this legislation,” the man said, referring to right-to-work. Had he ever run for office? Richardville asked. The man said no. “Well, when you grow a set and give that a try,” Richardville snapped, “then you can talk about the size of my testicles.”

Jackson was wide awake now. “Good for you,” he said. “How’d it end?”

IN THE PREDAWN TWILIGHT of December 4, 2012, Randy Richardville, the Republican majority leader of the Michigan Senate, called an old friend to deliver some grim news. Richardville’s two-hour commute to the state capitol in Lansing gave him plenty of time to check in with friends, staff, and colleagues, who were accustomed to his early morning calls. None more so than Mike Jackson.

Jackson was wide awake now. “Good for you,” he said. “How’d it end?”

“Mike, you’re fucked,” Richardville said. “They’ve got all the money they need, they’re going up on the air, and they’re going to push this freedom-to-work thing.”

Wasn’t there some way to head off the bill? Jackson asked. “They’ve got my caucus,” Richardville replied. “You can’t imagine the pressure I’m under.”

Jackson was wide awake now. “Good for you,” he said. “How’d it end?”

The pressure came largely from one man present at that fundraiser: Richard “Dick” DeVos Jr. The 58-year-old scion of the Amway Corporation, DeVos had arm-twisted Richardville repeatedly to support right-to-work. After six years of biding their time, DeVos and his allies believed the 2012 lame duck was the time to strike. They had formulated a single, all-encompassing strategy: They had a fusillade of TV, radio, and internet ads in the works. They’d crafted 15 pages of talking points to circulate to Republican lawmakers. They had even reserved the lawn around the state capitol for a month to keep protesters at bay.

A week after Richardville’s early morning call to Jackson, it was all over. With a stroke of his pen on December 11, Gov. Rick Snyder—who’d previously said right-to-work was not a priority of his—now made Michigan the 24th state to enact it. The governor marked the occasion by reciting, nearly verbatim, talking points that DeVos and his allies had distributed. “Freedom-to-work,” he said, is “pro-worker and pro-Michigan.”
THE DEVOSES sit alongside the Kochs, the Bradleys, and the Coorses as founding families of the modern conservative movement. Since 1970, DeVos family members have invested at least $200 million in a host of right-wing causes—think tanks, media outlets, political committees, evangelical outfits, and a string of advocacy groups. They have helped fund nearly every prominent Republican running for national office and underwritten a laundry list of conservative campaigns on issues ranging from charter schools and vouchers to anti-gay-marriage and anti-tax ballot measures. “There’s not a Republican president or presidential candidate in the last 50 years who hasn’t known the DeVoses,” says Saul Anuzis, a former chairman of the Michigan Republican Party.

Nowhere has the family made its presence felt as it has in Michigan, where it has given more than $44 million to the state party, GOP legislative committees, and Republican candidates since 1997. “It’s been a generational commitment,” Anuzis notes. “I can’t start to even think of who would’ve filled the void without the DeVoses there.”

The family fortune flows from 87-year-old Richard DeVos Sr. The son of poor Dutch immigrants, he cofounded the multilevel-marketing giant Amway with Jay Van Andel, a high school pal, in 1959. Five decades later, the company now sells $11 billion a year worth of cosmetics, vitamin supplements, kitchenware, air fresheners, and other household products. Amway has earned DeVos Sr. at least $6 billion; in 1991, he expanded his empire by buying the NBA’s Orlando Magic. The Koch brothers can usually expect Richard and his wife, Helen, to attend their biannual donor meetings. He is a lifelong Christian conservative and crusader for free markets and small government, values he passed down to his four children.

Many buildings in Grand Rapids, like the Amway Grand Plaza Hotel, bear the name of Richard DeVos Sr. or his company

Populated by the descendants of devout Dutch immigrants, Grand Rapids is a deeply Christian enclave that locals call “GRusalem.” Once a city of furniture makers, Grand Rapids began to prosper in the 1970s and 1980s, thanks largely to Amway. Launched in an abandoned gas station, the company grew into an empire by enlisting an army of “independent business owners,” or IBOs, to peddle Amway’s wares, eventually expanding to more than 100 countries and territories. The company formulated the business model now used by the likes of Mary Kay, Avon, and Herbalife, in which salespeople earn money by recruiting others into the business. In 1975, the Federal Trade Commission accused Amway of operating a pyramid scheme, but after a years-long investigation the agency rescinded the charge. http://www.motherjones.com/politics/2014/01/devos-michigan-labor-politics-go

 

GO SIGN YOUR LIFE AWAY TO SLAVERY

 

In keeping with previous years, two grand prizes will be awarded: a $200,000 Popular Vote Grand Prize, and a $200,000 Juried Grand Prize. Eight juried category awards, each worth $12,500 will also be named.

https://news.artnet.com/in-brief/artprize-seventh-year-2015-287174?utm_campaign=artnetnews&utm_source=040615daily&utm_medium=em

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2 thoughts on ““MIKE YOU’RE FUCKED.” CAN’T GET BETTER SLIME THAN THIS! SO YOU WANNA BE AN ARTIST?

  1. This is incomprehensible! Ever hear of editing? What does any of this have to do with art competitions?

    1. Dear James, I only approved your comment so that others can see how someone can read a posted article, not be able to connect the dots, demonstrate very little understanding of the article and stills has some incomprehensible idea that sharing your opinion actually contributes to others’ understanding of how completely rotted “the art world” however it may now be define, I would call most of it just a different versions of Swamp People Tv show. the extensive details on the Amway heirs were given so that those with the capability of below the surface understanding/reading between the lines, but in this case that wasn’t even required of how much filthy maneuvering, to which many are either ignorant or have become inured,is wrapped up in pretty packages to entice unsuspecting victims to support probably non intended groups in the idealistic hopes that their talent would not be exploited.

      In a nutshell, throw the poor, starving artists a bone, let them “fight” and amaze us at their talent, while we subvert the entire governmental system, let us continue to concentrate our wealth, and by the way, we’ll still specifically exempt student loans from discharge in bankruptcy as they did in 1997 and which all the current generation mostly is blind to it’s effects but certainly not to its implications and consequences.

      The art competitions are bait and switch techniques, or just plan PT Barnum techniques. I’m surprised you couldn’t understand that immediately.

      All the best,

      Elizabeth

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