GOTTA BE THE FUNNIEST AND MOST BRAZEN MISUSE OF DURER ART EVER -BUT SO INVENTIVE!

THIS NONSENSE DESERVES AT LEAST A TIP OF THE HAT FOR IT’S BRAZENNESS in taking something really non-Duerer and pretending it is not even the detail of the “lace’ or designs is intricate enough to cal it Duerer inspired.  Looks like all the Belgian lace tablecloths available in the tourist shops. All for $408! It made me laugh so hard, I thought I’d share with all for it reallyis marketing spin at it’s best. White silicon even AKA rubber, just what every hostess wants on their dinner table!

 

Enjoy! I guess they do work hard at this 🙂

 

Had Albrecht Dürer been able to attend this year’s Salone Milan, he would have been pleased to see his designs getting a new breath of life thanks to the work of deJongeKalff. The Dutch design studio based its silicon Table Skin Embroidery on one of Dürer’s woodcuts

 

The artists Jennifer de Jonge and Roos Kalff founded deJongeKalff in 2011; since then, they’ve continued to work independently while pursuing some projects jointly, having discovering the benefits that come with co-working and the cross-pollination of disciplines. (No doubt Dürer, who was a painter, engraver, printmaker, mathematician, and theorist, would have approved.) One of the beneficial byproducts of this arrangement was the Table Skin. Kalff got the idea for the product after observing de Jonge experiment with pouring leftover rubber from another project over various glass plates. Fascinated with how the heavy material fell and revealed the structure beneath it, Kalff immediately thought of the drapes and folds of a tablecloth.

deJongeKalff-TableSkin-2.jpgAlbrecht Dürer’s woodcut Pattern from the Series of Six Knots, completed in 1507, was the inspiration for a new version of deJongeKalff’s Table Skin on display in Milan earlier this month.

 

I DON’T THINK SO, THERE IS NO DUPLICATION OF COMPLEXITY.  JUST A LOT OF TWISTED SILICON SWIRLS.  SO FUNNY!

deJongeKalff-TableSkin-3.jpg

So the designers set out to create an actual tablecloth in this manner. First deJongeKalff covered the top of a table with a large bread of clay weighing roughly 22 pounds, building it up to about six millimeters in thickness and rubbing it until it was mirror smooth. Then the artists experimented with pressing various objects into the clay: “pineapple, knots, spoons, different strings, all we could find in the studio and its surrounding shops,” de Jonge says. Pouring rubber over the surface, the designers would look at the results and evaluate them before trying something else.

“Ultimately, we chose to work with haberdashery,” de Jonge says, referring to the small sewing items sold by a haberdasher, such as beads, buttons, needles and ribbons. “You will see the very detailed wire work in the rubber, the weaving, the fineness of the design.” Not that everything they tried was a success. “A lot of objects worked better than others,” de Jonge admits. “It depends on the thickness, the smoothness, how big the object is. Of course, it really depends on the end result you are looking for.” For Roos and de Jonge, that result was a design that blended the understated elegance of white damask linen with the ornate detailing of Persian carpets.

deJongeKalff-TableSkin-4.jpgThe designers started by pressing various objects into a layer of clay spread across a tabletop, then pouring rubber over the surface and evaluating the results.

deJongeKalff-TableSkin-5.jpgEventually, they worked their way up to an elaborate arrangement of thread, ribbons, beads and other objects.

Using rope and other small bits, they pressed the pieces into the clay along with adorned trims and edge detailing, known as fournituren. Once the silicone rubber was poured, the designers let the material set before removing it from the clay mold, being careful not to damage the mold. In cases where the casting got caught, they were able to easily tear through the rubber to free it.

 

So where does Dürer come in? After Droog and the Rijksmuseum finalized their partnership for Milan, Droog went back to deJongeKalff and commissioned a special edition of the Table Skin. Pulling the Dürer woodcut Pattern from the Series of Six Knots from the Rijksmuseum’s collection, Droog asked deJongeKalff to translate a tablecloth specifically from the enduring wood carving. The studio reused techniques from its earlier explorations and invented some new ones, like using metal plunger chains and balls to lay out Dürer’s design. The final piece was shown as part of a dining room display at the Milan exhibition—and it can now be purchased online for 295 euros, or about $408.

 

SURE.  METAL PLUNGER AND CHAINS TO LAY OUT A RUBBER DESIGN?  THAT’S GONADS!

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2 thoughts on “GOTTA BE THE FUNNIEST AND MOST BRAZEN MISUSE OF DURER ART EVER -BUT SO INVENTIVE!

  1. Do yoou have a spam issue on this blog; I also am a blogger, annd I was wanting to know your
    situation

    1. I’m using WordPress. There is a fabulous plugin called Askimet, when installed, works fabulous, takes 1 minute to install. Blocks all spam.

      I am flattered by all of you wonderful people who are impressed enough with the quaikty of my articles to return and ask technical questions re improving their own websites and I am grateful that you find find my advice of use. If you have read my bio, I am a computer expert, and I realize how frustrating it is for all who are attempting to improve their writing.

      But this website is about the secrets of the Durer Cipher and the absolute mess of the reality of the art world, the frauds, the fakes, the forgery, the nutty things people do to each other and I hope you are visiting here for that information.there is plenty of information on the web re how to blog effectively. I o not ish for this it to become bloggig technical resource on a regular basis.

      Pls come learn about the truth of the Durer cipher and the art world. I believe I hav ready answered most of everyone’s tech questions before,myounjustbneed to read thrum those previously published reponses Pls take dvantage of those answers.

      I wish you well in all your endeavors.

      Best,
      Elizabeth

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