THE SIN of SEX AND LUST-ADAM AND EVA-This is NO GARDEN OF PARADISE-PART III

Margret's 9 as represented in the 1504 Adam and Eva print on the tablet
Margret’s 9 as represented in the 1504 Adam and Eva print on the tablet

IS THE PARROT TELLING US SOMETHING?

Look at the inscription in the tablet under the parrot, which you see on the left. In the third line of the inscription on the left we have the masculine form of the word “Norica”-of Hungary, the same word found hidden in the neckline of the woman in the Promenade you see on the right-the word that means “from Hungary.”

What is on this tablet is a declaration by Dürer.  He declares in Latin that he made this print.  Which is very odd.  For on this same tablet is ALSO his monogram, which you see in the lower left of the inscription, which is how he always identified his designs.

Why the duplication? Even odder is the fact that he uses the Mystical sign of 4 Merchant Mark as part of the date and the “5” of the 1504 was originally backwards, associated with Münzer in previous prints, and that Münzer is inextricably now tied to the Dürers, via Margret’s bastard daughter, Margaret.  This makes for three declarations that Dürer made this print. Three declarations makes no sense, unless the inscription actually says something else.

 WHAT’S IN A NAME? LATIN, AND MORE LATIN  AND MORE LATIN EVERYWHERE?

The INSCRIPTION ON THE TABLET:

The typical translation of what is on this tablet is the following: Albertus (a “9“ at the end of the Albert is considered to be shorthand Latin for the suffix “us”) Dürer Noricus Faciebat 1504-and is translated as Albrecht Dürer of Nuremberg made this in 1504.  This is the accepted standard translation.

If we study how Dürer signed his compositions we find an interesting pattern: he identifies himself as either the German (Alemanus), Norembergensis (the Nuremberger), or Noricus (the Hungarian)

Slide045

If Dürer paints in Italy, he indictes that he is the German-normal to declare to the Italians. He signs his work as Albertus Dürer Alemanus faciebat for the following paintings: Maria with the Zeisig-1506 , Painting of Eve-1507, Painting of the Martydom of the 10,000-1508 Assumption of Mary-in the Heller alterpiece-middle painting, conception for his self-portrait at the London Museum “Alberti Dürer Alemani.”  All Latin conjugation is correct

I’M THE GERMAN!

Dürer signs himself as the Nuremberger “Albertus Dürer Norenbergensis” faciebat” when doing commissions for Germans since they would expect him to sign as a Nuremberger.  He does this for the Holy Family painting, the Resurrection of Christ -1510, Samsons Battle Against the Philistines  faciebat 1510

AND NOW I’M THE HUNGARIAN AGAIN!

Dürer uses Albert Dürer Noricus faciebat when ever he refers to himself as the Hungarian or is doing a work for someone who is also of Hungarian descent or connected with Hungary in an official capacity. These examples are: for Adam & Eve, in Ulrich Varnbuhler’s woodcut, in Johannes Klebeger painting (E[FFIGIES] IOAN[N]I KLEBERGERS NORICI AN[N]O AETA[TIS] SVAE XXXX), The title page on the Large Passion(Alberti Düreri Norici-proper Latin),The Life of the Virgin (Alberto Dürero Norico-proper Latin).

 

durer albrecht margret sex ranisaance women artists art nuremberg go
CRIMES IN THE ART: THE SECRET CIPHER OF ALBRECHT DÜRER with Albrecht’s famous 1500 Self Portrait on the cover signed as the Hungarian

He uses Albertus Dürerus Noricus EFFINGEBAM COLORIBUS in his Christ like self-portrait  of 1500, effingebam coloribus meaning in everlating enduring colors. Also for the  LANDAUR ALTERPIECE, the Adoration of the Trinity-1511,since the Landauers were connected with Hungary (Laundaur’s son-in-law was Wilhelm Haller in Vienna)

The only anomaly is the bad Latin combination of the  Small Passion which is signed “Alberto Dürer Nurenbergensi.”   It is speculated that the Frontispiece for this Small Passion work was added later; the Latin doesn’t grammatically match at all in any word and he declares himself as a Nuremberger.  This indicates a clear difference of how he felt about creating the Large Passion and the Life of the Virgin, that someone uneducated in proper Latin Grammar designed this signature or cut this signature incorrectly-we won’t ever know.

But that is NOT what this inscription says. STAY TUNED FOR PART 4

Share the postShare on Google+Tweet about this on TwitterShare on TumblrPin on PinterestShare on LinkedInShare on Facebook